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Serious About Your Career in Coaching? Make Sure You Get Top-notch Training

March 23, 2010

Coach-Training-March-2010-FINAL.doc — DOC, 70144KB

The International Coach Federation (ICF) urges those pursing a coaching career to avoid programs promising to prepare you in just a weekend—those with a “get-rich-quick” feel—and set their sights on coach training programs of the highest quality.

Lexington, Kentucky, USA – The International Coach Federation (ICF) urges those pursing a coaching career to avoid programs promising to prepare you in just a weekend—those with a “get-rich-quick” feel—and set their sights on coach training programs of the highest quality.

As with any career, the first step to becoming a coach is to receive specific training in the field. While individuals can benefit from their past education and experience, coaching is a distinct service that individuals must learn how to provide. The 2009 ICF Global Coaching Client Study shows that 89 percent* of coaching clients considered the level of coach-specific training a coach had important during their coach selection process. Taking the time to build coaching skills and practice coaching competencies in the beginning will benefit not only those inspiring to be coaches but their future clients as well.

The ICF recommends researching coach training program options and finding a quality program that fits your needs. Programs vary in length, focus, and delivery, including in-person training, distance learning or a mixture of both, and may be independent or part of a larger school curriculum. Connect with other coaches to learn about their coach training experience and for recommendations. 

“There are things easily accomplished in one weekend—a home improvement project, finishing a good book, planting a garden—but becoming a professional coach isn’t one of them,” said ICF President and Master Certified Coach Giovanna D’Alessio. “Becoming a true professional coach takes time, proper training, and experience; that is why the ICF encourages those pursuing a career in coaching to get quality training from an ICF-accredited program that meets the industry’s highest standards.”

To help with the coach training program selection process, the ICF awards their approval to programs who voluntary apply to be reviewed by the ICF and demonstrate a commitment to the highest standards for curricula, faculty, structure, and proficiency, in addition to teaching and abiding by the ICF Code of Ethics and ICF Core Competencies. You can start your search for an ICF-approved training program through the free ICF Training Program Search Service at Coachfederation.org, which lists all 135 programs currently approved by the ICF.

ICF defines coaching as partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential. Coaching is a distinct service and differs greatly from therapy, consulting, mentoring or training. Individuals who engage in a coaching relationship can expect to experience fresh perspectives on personal challenges and opportunities, enhanced thinking and decision-making skills, enhanced interpersonal effectiveness, and increased confidence in carrying out their chosen work and life roles.

The International Coach Federation is the leading global organization for coaches, with over 16,900 members in more than 90 countries, dedicated to advancing the coaching profession by setting high ethical standards, providing independent certification, and building a worldwide network of credentialed coaches. The ICF is the only organization that awards a global credential which is currently held by more than 6,100 coaches worldwide. For more information on how to become or find an ICF Credentialed coach, please visit our Web site at www.coachfederation.org.

* The 2009 ICF Global Coaching Client Study conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and Association Resource Centre Inc. Results representative of survey respondent sample.